I-CORE - Israeli Centers Of Research Excellence I-CORE - Israeli Centers Of Research Excellence I-CORE - Israeli Centers Of Research Excellence Israeli Centers Of Research Excellence

I-CORE Second Wave

Study of Modern Jewish Culture

Study of Modern Jewish Culture

"Da'at Hamakom": Center for the Study of Cultures of Place in the Modern Jewish World.

 

Participating Researchers and Institutions:

 

The group selected to establish this I-CORE is a group under the scientific management of Prof. Richard Cohen of the Hebrew University, consisting of researchers from the Hebrew University, Bar-Ilan University, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and Tel-Aviv University.

 

Scientific Director: Prof. Cohen Richard, Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry, Hebrew University

 

Administrative Director: Anat Reches

 

Scientific Management Members:

 

  • Prof. Cohen Richard, Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry, Hebrew University
  • Prof. Lederhendler Eli, Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry, Hebrew University
  • Prof. Reiner Elchanan, Dept. Jewish History, Tel Aviv University
  • Prof. Seroussi Edwin, Musicology, Hebrew University
  • Prof. Weiss Yfaat, Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry, Hebrew University

Additional I-CORE Members:

 

  • Prof. Blondheim Menahem, Dept. of Communication and Dept. of History, Hebrew University
  • Dr. Hilfrich Carola, General and Comparative Literature / Cultural Studies, Hebrew University
  • Prof. Hirschfeld Ariel, Hebrew Literature, Hebrew University
  • Prof. Pedaya Haviva, Jewish History, Ben-Gurion University
  • Prof. Raz-Krakotzkin Amnon, Jewish History, Ben-Gurion University
  • Prof. Zohar Zvi, Jewish Studies and Law Faculties, Bar-Ilan University

 

New faculty:

2013-14:

  • Dr. Ofer Ashkenazi, Hebrew University, returned from Minnesota University

 

Research Focus:

 

The I-CORE's approach to Modern Jewish Culture is the spatial dimension in all of its connotations. It was once common to assert that Jewish culture was characterized by its portability, abstractness, and lack of grounding in any given physical space. Jewish "space" was acknowledged, if at all, as the self segregation of the "ghetto". Since then, an entire generation of scholars, both in Israel and abroad, has argued that Jewish cultures are closely intertwined (in the plurality of their symbolic systems and practices) with specific locales where they are produced or consumed. Today it becomes necessary to re-define cultures of "place" as a focal point in understanding Jewish life and culture. How has the relation between "place" and "Jewish culture" changed in light of the vicissitudes of the 20th century and the creation of a Jewish homeland?
Expected Significance: "Place" (in Hebrew, makom -- מקום ) is a strategic master key with which to explore the tensions that characterize Jewish culture in modernity, namely, between the sacred and the secular, the local and the global, the historical and the virtual, Jewish culture and other cultures.
In bringing together scholars who have sought ways in which one remembers, dreams of a place, physical or imaginary, and conveys this in cultural media, we hope to place these critical intricacies into a comparative, cross-cultural and interdisciplinary context in an age of globalization. This will better enable us to address notions of Jewish identity, creativity, tradition, and forms of attachment and belonging in the modern era.

 

For the I-CORE website: http://www.daat-hamakom.com/

 

For more information please contact: anatrech@savion.huji.ac.il